Video Game Review: Bloodrayne: Betrayal [XBLA, 2011]

Bloodrayne: Betrayal [XBLA, 2011]

Bloodrayne: Betrayal
System: Xbox 360 (also available on PS3)
Publisher: Majesco
Developer: WayForward
Release Date: September 7, 2011

It’s been a while since I have both equally loved and hated a video game like I do with Bloodrayne: Betrayal. I haven’t played either of the series’ first two games (both on PS2/Xbox) or seen Uwe Boll’s critically-despised movie adaptations, but this is not important since Betrayal represents a ‘reboot’ of sorts for the titular character.

First and foremost, Bloodrayne: Betrayal is a 2D side-scrolling beat ’em up with platforming elements, and its gameplay harkens back to gaming classics such as the early Castlevania titles. I also noticed similarities to the Contra series, both of which are personal favorites of mine. I am a sucker for old school throwbacks, and Betrayal almost feels like a modernized remake of a long lost title from that era, right down to its extreme difficulty.

Seriously, this is one of the most punishing games I have played in a while. There are some downright brutal spots in the game that made me want to smash my controller, a feeling that I have not had in ages. The beat ’em up gameplay is not so bad once you get the hang of it, but there are some insanely tricky platforming sections that cause a significant amount grief. Two chapters in particular are especially difficult due to having to time Rayne’s jumps perfectly while dodging enemies and buzzsaws at the same time. Chapter 13 alone is the stuff of nightmares. Needless to say, this game isn’t for the faint of heart.

I felt pretty damn proud of myself to complete some of the more challenging levels, but when I was finished the game gave me an “F” rating every time, calling me “worm food” in the process. Talk about demoralizing. Yet like a good little gamer, I kept coming back for more, and continued to get better as I went along. Finding hidden skulls in each level can provide increases in health and weapon supplies, and this helps out a little bit. I also noticed a significant improvement in my performance while revisiting earlier levels, which was certainly a good feeling.

The game has fifteen chapters in all, and it rewards playing through them multiple times in order to find the aforementioned skulls and to obtain a higher score, just like the good ol’ days. There are a decent variety of enemies, some simple and others disgusting, and Rayne has access to a good amount of combat moves/tricks.

Even if you can tolerate the game’s harder-than-usual difficulty like myself, Betrayal is not without flaws. For one, the in-game tutorials are not helpful at all. In one of the early chapters, I got stuck at a part where I had to jump on the heads of enemy flies in order to reach a higher point. Well, the tutorial never popped up for me so I had no clue how to actually land on them without falling back down. After some trial and error, I found a helpful moves list in the menu, but it would have been nice to see this pop up like it was supposed to.

Another issue I had was with the sometimes spotty controls. This was most noticeable while going through some of the platforming areas since they require extreme precision to complete. I cannot count how many times I died just because Rayne’s animation pushed her over a little farther than anticipated. Thankfully checkpoints are common, as every little bit helps here. Also, there were moments where it seemed the game was more difficult than it needed to be simply because Rayne’s animations would take too long and allow enemies to get in some cheap hits while she was down. If you are quick enough, you can find a way around this, but it takes some time to get the hang of it.

Bloodrayne: Betrayal [XBLA, 2011]

Still, even though Rayne’s animations can sometimes take a little long to complete, it must be said that the game is absolutely gorgeous. The visuals are done in a style similar to anime, and they are a definite highlight of the game. Animations are fluid, and combat can get obscenely violent at times; this makes for some joyous eye candy on screen. Blood flies out of enemies (and Rayne herself, if you are not careful), and occasionally spurts out Kill Bill-style. It’s a blast to look at, and it helps that the game is backed by an incredible soundtrack that sounds a hell of a lot like what was used in Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. It’s a good fit for this title, and aesthetically the game is hard to top.

How much you will like Bloodrayne: Betrayal comes down to how difficult you like your games. If you grew up on the Castlevania and Contra games of yore, you will feel right at home here. If you are instantly turned off to a game if you struggle to get through a level, then this likely isn’t for you. With some tweaks here and there, Bloodrayne: Betrayal could have been a more consistently great adventure, but it still worth looking into if you’re up for a good challenge.

7/10

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4 thoughts on “Video Game Review: Bloodrayne: Betrayal [XBLA, 2011]

  1. John says:

    So the game is super tough eh? I’ll probably skip out on it but it definitely has its hooks. I did terrible during the demo, I also was graded with an F.

    • Eric says:

      Yeah, it’s quite the challenge, especially in the chapters where platforming is a major part. I still had fun with the game even though it drove me nuts sometimes. 🙂

  2. Jsick says:

    I played and reviewed this one too and had pretty much the sane experience you did. I was very turned off by the spotty controls and grueling difficulty though, so I didn’t really care for the title. The animation, however, was beautiful, and morsels of great gameplay were scattered about which was nice too.

    • Eric says:

      Yeah, I could see how the difficulty would turn off a lot of potential gamers. It could have been cleaned up a bit, but I still had a lot of fun with the title. I’ll be sure to check out your review as well.

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