Movie Project #15: All About My Mother [1999]

Due to the surprising success of my initial Movies Project, I decided to do a part two for 2012. This time around I put a greater emphasis on directors I am not familiar with, but I also tried to compile a mix of different genres and eras. This will be an ongoing project with the finish date being sometime this year.

All About My Mother [1999]

All About My Mother [1999]
Director: Pedro Almodóvar
Genre: Drama
Starring: Cecilia Roth, Marisa Paredes, Antonia San Juan, Penélope Cruz and Candela Peña
Runtime: 101 minutes

It is fitting that I included All About My Mother in this movie project, especially after recently watching All About Eve. Pedro Almodóvar’s 1999 ode to women won the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar that year, and it is laced with references to the seminal 1950 classic. Not only is this a movie also dominated by women, but there is even a brief clip of a Spanish dubbed version of All About Eve near the beginning of the film. At one point, the main character is even called Eve Harrington by name as a sort of insult. What’s funny is that I didn’t plan this at all; I added All About My Mother simply because multiple sources told me this was a great entry point into Pedro Almodóvar’s canon. Mission accomplished: I am now eager to see more of his work.

Argentine actress Cecilia Roth stars as Manuela, a nurse overcome by grief after watching her 17-year-old son die in a tragic car accident. Still suffering, she quits her job in the organ transplant department and travels to Barcelona to find her son’s father and tell him the news. While there, she meets up with an old friend, transvestite prostitute Agrado (Antonia San Juan), becomes close to a pregnant nun (Penélope Cruz), and also begins working for famous actress Huma Rojo (Marisa Peredes).

All About My Mother [1999]

The lives of all four ladies become intertwined, but Manuela is very much the center of the film. Her maternal instincts are constantly being shown, as not only did she care for her son Esteban in the beginning, but she also spends much of the movie taking care of the nun Rosa during her pregnancy. Manuela is a powerful woman with a rough past, and this is displayed flawlessly by Cecilia Roth.

While a straight drama dealing with powerful topics, All About My Mother does have moments of much-welcomed comedy. These snippets of humor are mostly provided by Agrado, who acts as a warm source of comic relief. Agrado’s likable demeanor is especially present when a stage play goes awry, and the character is forced to improvise alone on stage. For a film that tackles such heavy topics as the death of a child, unplanned pregnancies and HIV, bits of laughter are very helpful to lighten the mood a bit.

All About My Mother [1999]

All About My Mother is an intriguing film, one that does not pull any punches. Perhaps most interesting is that everyone was portrayed in the same light — men, women, transgender, none of that mattered. We are all human, and I don’t know if I have seen a better movie to demonstrate this.

8/10

 

Also, I would like to take this time to write a quick “For Your Consideration” note. As many of you know, the LAMMY Awards are underway. If you are a member of the wonderful LAMB (Large Association of Movie Blogs) community, I would love if you considered this 50 Movies Project for the Best Running Feature category. The Warning Sign is also eligible for Best New LAMB, and it would be a blast to be nominated for either award (or anything else, for that matter). Thanks as always for reading, and for your helpful consideration!

Movie Project #11: All About Eve [1950]

Due to the surprising success of my initial Movies Project, I decided to do a second round for 2012. This time around I put a greater emphasis on directors I am not familiar with, but I also tried to compile a mix of different genres and eras. This will be an ongoing project with the finish date being sometime this year.

All About Eve [1950]

All About Eve [1950]
Director: Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Genre: Drama
Starring: Bette Davis, Anne Baxter and George Sanders
Runtime: 138 minutes

Fasten your seatbelts, it’s going to be a bumpy night!

A popular debate amongst cinephiles is what film should have won Best Picture in 1950. Two similarly themed movies were competing that year — Sunset Boulevard and All About Eve — with both showcasing the cruel side of show business. Both features are now considered absolute classics, and after watching Sunset Boulevard in last year’s project, I just had to check out its chief competitor this time around.

All About Eve stars Bette Davis as Margo Channing, an extremely popular Broadway diva who is desperately trying to maintain her top star billing despite her increasing age. One night after a performance, her good friend Karen Richards (Celeste Holm) notices a young fan standing in the rain outside the theater. After a brief chat, Karen invites the fan, who we come to know as Eve Harrington (Anne Baxter), backstage to meet her idol. After some initial reservations, Margo warms up to her starstruck follower and invites her into her home. Eve becomes something of a personal assistant for the actress, but it doesn’t take long for Margo to suspect that she has some ulterior motives at hand. It turns out that Margo is right — Eve is using the star for her own personal gain, with her ultimate goal being to become an even bigger name.

All About Eve [1950]

The plot opens itself up to all sorts of backhanded actions and sneaky powerplay tactics as Eve tries to undercut her idol. She puts the moves on both Margo’s lover and Karen’s husband, and attempts to manipulate the theater critic Addison DeWitt (George Sanders). This doesn’t go so well, as DeWitt knows what games Eve is playing, and he uses it to his advantage.

Essentially, the movie is a brazen tale of backstage politics that essentially lifts the curtain for all to see. The women are the ones very much in power here, and in fact, the writer DeWitt is the only male with any substance in this film. This gives way to classic dialogue delivered by the Broadway divas, as Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s screenplay oozes with sarcasm and catty banter. This is regarded as one of the greatest screenplays of all time, and it is the snarky backbone to what is a straightforward film, heavy on dialogue.

All About Eve [1950]

When critics discuss All About Eve, they are glowing in their remarks about Bette Davis. This has come to be her most renowned performance, and she really is on top of her game here. I wouldn’t doubt that Davis was able to channel some of her real life experiences into this role. Both her and Anne Baxter were nominated for Best Actress that year, though neither won. The common belief is that both of them ruined their chances by going up for the same award.

George Sanders was the only Oscar winner from the film, as he took home the gold for Best Supporting Actor. His role as the take-no-shit DeWitt is a good one indeed, as he is the only one able to best Eve at her own game. Special mention must also be made of a young Marilyn Monroe, who has a small role as a young up-and-coming actress (just like reality at the time). She is stunning in every scene she is in, and it’s hard not to focus on her, even when she is in the background.

All About Eve won Best Picture in 1950, as well as five other Oscars (including best screenplay). While I prefer Sunset Boulevard myself, I can see why so many were smitten with All About Eve during that time. Bette Davis is in prime form here, and the movie has the snarkiest screenplay I have ever seen. I’m not sure the film holds up as well today since the on screen antics are no longer as shocking, but there’s no denying this is a well-crafted film.

8/10