Horror Movie Roundup #3: Slither, An American Werewolf in London, Eden Lake

The first two films in this batch of horror reviews work quite well together, but Eden Lake is definitely an outlier here. Nonetheless, here are my takes:

Slither [2006]
Slither [2006]
A loving tribute to early 80s horror B-movies, Slither tells the tale of a small town that is over-run by a plague of worms that is turning its denizens into all sorts of creepy monsters. There’s a little bit of everything in this horror-comedy, including zombies, blobs and other grotesque freaks, and fans of Nathan Fillion, Elizabeth Banks and Michael Rooker will get a kick out of this. Rooker, in particular, is as enjoyably creepy as always. The special effects are over-the-top and rather well done, and they enhance the film’s cheesiness. Some jokes fall flat, and the story is full of cliches, but Slither is good for what it is. Worth seeing for fans of the genre. 6/10

An American Werewolf in London [1981]
An American Werewolf in London [1981]
I was pleasantly surprised by this cult classic. When two Americans backpacking through England are attacked by a werewolf, one of them turns into a werewolf himself. The locals refuse to acknowledge the existence of the monsters, so it’s up to the American to figure out a way to put a stop to his own potential killing spree. There’s a lot to like in this film, as John Landis’ script is full of great lines (“A naked American man stole my balloons.”), and the Oscar-winning special effects still hold up today. It’s a fun watch overall, and I’m glad I was finally able to track it down. 7.5/10

Eden Lake [2008]
Eden Lake [2008]
“Relentless” is the perfect term to describe this lesser-known British horror film. When Steve (Michael Fassbender) and Jenny (Kelly Reilly) leave the city for a romantic getaway at a rural lake, their dream weekend goes awry when they run into a group of young hoodlums. Rather than move to a different location, the bull-headed Steve confronts the youths, and it doesn’t take long for things to escalate. The film gets increasingly violent (as evidenced by the image above), and it essentially becomes a game of cat-and-mouse between the kids and the couple. It’s a very bleak, punishing film, and I can’t recall ever being as angry afterward as I was with this. Some of the actions of all involved were questionable and left me frustrated, but there is no denying that this is both well-directed and well-acted. It’s just hard to recommend a film so full of despair. 6/10

Have you seen any of these films? What are your thoughts on them?

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