Movie Project #30: Ringu [1998]

Due to the surprising success of my initial Movies Project, I decided to do a part two for 2012. This time around I put a greater emphasis on directors I am not familiar with, but I also tried to compile a mix of different genres and eras. This will be an ongoing project with the finish date being sometime this year.

Ringu [1998]

Ringu [1998]
Director: Hideo Nakata
Genre: Horror/Mystery
Starring: Nanako Matsushima, Miki Nakatani and Yûko Takeuchi
Runtime: 96 minutes

My experience with Japanese horror movies is very, very limited. In fact, I can only remember seeing Audition, and that was many years ago. When I initially compiled my 50 movies project, it was suggested that I include something from the genre. As the highest grossing horror film in Japan, Ringu seemed like an obvious starting point.

Those who have seen the 2002 American remake, The Ring, are likely familiar with the premise. A group of teenagers have discovered a cursed videotape that will kill its viewers seven days after watching. A reporter, Reiko Asakawa (Nanako Matsushima), starts a personal investigation of this matter after it is rumored that her niece and a few friends died from the curse. Eventually she discovers the tape herself, watches it and then frantically has to find a way to reverse the process and stay alive. She gains help from her ex-husband Ryuji Takayama (Hiroyuki Sanada), but can they solve the mystery in time?

Ringu [1998]

By now, more than a decade later, the film’s more memorable moments have been ingrained into the pop culture canon. The creepy little girl with long black hair, the bizarre content on the videotape, the sudden appearance of a large eyeball — anyone with half a pulse will recognize these. The common perception, with these idiosyncracies in mind, is that Ringu is scary as hell. I was expecting to *finally* be scared by a movie, something that has never happened to me. Alas, I was surprised to learn that Ringu is more of a mystery film than anything.

Sure, the suspense is riveting and the atmosphere creepy, but there was never a moment where I became frightened. The eyeball was alarming, but that was more peculiar than anything. Taken as a horror film, this is a little disappointing. As a mystery, however, this is more intriguing.

Ringu [1998]

Even though I knew what to expect from most of the film, I was generally interested throughout. The slow build creates subtle tension, and while it has its more convoluted moments, the culmination into an epic 10-minute frenzy at the end is unforgettable. For some, though, I imagine this payoff is too little, too late.

Ringu is a good, solid film, but I feel that it has lost some of its flair over the years. The mystery story is well-crafted and the performances are strong, but it is mostly forgettable outside of a few select moments. That being said, I am definitely interested in seeing more of the genre.

7/10

 
Now I’m ready to revisit The Ring. What do you guys prefer? Ringu or The Ring?

Movie Project #14: To Kill a Mockingbird [1962]

Due to the surprising success of my initial Movies Project, I decided to do a part two for 2012. This time around I put a greater emphasis on directors I am not familiar with, but I also tried to compile a mix of different genres and eras. This will be an ongoing project with the finish date being sometime this year.

To Kill a Mockingbird [1962]

To Kill a Mockingbird [1962]
Director: Robert Mulligan
Genre: Crime/Drama/Mystery
Starring: Gregory Peck, Mary Badham, Phillip Alford, Brock Peters
Runtime: 129 minutes

Way back in high school, in one of my English classes, I was assigned to read Harper Lee’s ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’. Already tired of reading less-than-desirable books (in my teenage eyes) such as ‘The Scarlet Letter’ and ‘The Great Gatsby’, I opted to stick to Cliff Notes for that particular classic. Looking back now, many years later, I wish I had read Lee’s famed novel, especially after finally viewing the 1962 film adaptation.

To Kill a Mockingbird is a snapshot of the 1930s Deep South as seen through the eyes of a six year old named Scout (Mary Badham). Our young protagonist and her brother Jem (Phillip Alford) enjoy life in their small rural town, playing around and making new friends, but they are also wary of this shady character named Boo Radley (Robert Duvall) who lives down the street. Legend has it that Boo is chained to a bed and only comes out at night. He’s also six and a half feet tall, and boasts a diet of raw squirrels and “all the cats he can catch.” Gotta love kids and their wild imaginations.

To Kill a Mockingbird [1962]

While the first act of the film focuses on the playful nature of the kids and their rural upbringing, the film takes a stunning turn once their father, town lawyer Atticus Finch (Gregory Peck), is assigned a new case. Atticus is selected to represent a black man, Tom Robinson (the terrific Brock Peters), who has been accused of raping a young white woman. Racism is running rampant during this time period, so naturally Tom doesn’t have much of a fighting chance despite there being an extraordinary amount of evidence to prove he is innocent.

During the actual trial, we are shown an absolutely incredible scene where Atticus delivers a powerful speech that any sane, non-bigoted person would believe and approve of. This is where Gregory Peck is at his finest. He delivers this speech with a sense of conviction in a way that makes everyone in the courtroom (viewers included) give him their full attention. It’s a shame that this moment is wasted shortly after when the jury finds Tom to be guilty anyway.

After the trial, life changes quickly for Atticus and his children. Many of the locals are irate over Atticus defending a black man, regardless of whether he was innocent or not. This hatred is defined by the movie’s villain, Bob Ewell (James K Anderson), the victim’s father and her true assailant. In a drunken stupor, he attacks Scout and Jem, only for them to be saved by the same man they were once scared of, Boo Radley. Funny how that works out.

To Kill a Mockingbird [1962]

To Kill a Mockingbird is an intriguing film that carefully tackles the issue of racism while also providing a nostalgic look at childhood. If I have any reservations, it is that the transition from playfulness to a serious court trial is a bit jarring, as it almost feels like two separate movies were merged together as one. Still, there’s no denying the film’s importance in history, and not enough can be said about Gregory Peck’s unforgettable performance.

While researching this, I learned that the film also had a lasting impression on its cast members. Gregory Peck received the pocketwatch of Harper Lee’s father, became the surrogate father to Mary Badham, and Brock Peters delivered Peck’s eulogy after his death in 2003. If that doesn’t show the lasting importance of this film, I don’t know what would.

9/10

Movie Project #13: Blue Velvet [1986]

Due to the surprising success of my initial Movies Project, I decided to do a second round for 2012. This time around I put a greater emphasis on directors I am not familiar with, but I also tried to compile a mix of different genres and eras. This will be an ongoing project with the finish date being sometime this year.

Blue Velvet [1986]

Blue Velvet [1986]
Director: David Lynch
Genre: Crime/Mystery/Thriller
Starring: Isabella Rossellini, Kyle MacLachlan and Dennis Hopper
Runtime: 120 minutes

I have been thinking about Blue Velvet quite a bit since I saw it two weeks ago, and I have struggled to put my thoughts into words. How does one write about a film so dark and peculiar, one that turns Middle America upside down on its head?

The classic opening scene sets the tone for this neo-noir. We see glimpses of blue skies, white picket fences, vibrant flowers, school children crossing the street, a man watering his lawn while his wife watches television inside. Suddenly, the man’s garden hose becomes tangled, and in the fuss to get it loose, he suffers a stroke and falls to the ground. A dog playfully sticks its head in and out of the still-flowing water as a child wanders onto the scene. The camera then makes its way through the blades of grass on the lawn before digging deeper into the beetle-infested dirt, no doubt a metaphor of the seedy underworld to be found in this glimpse of suburbia.

The old man’s stroke serves as an introduction to our protagonist, his son Jeffrey (Kyle MacLachlan), a college student who comes into town to visit his ailing father. After walking home from the hospital, he spots a severed ear near the side of the road. Jeffrey takes the ear to Police Detective Williams (George Dickerson), and meets the detective’s daughter Sandy (Laura Dern) for the first time. She gives Jeffrey a tip about the missing ear, and the two of them decide to do some sleuthing on their own.

The investigation leads them to the apartment of nightclub singer Dorothy Vallens (Isabella Rossellini), and this is where the movie takes a bizarre and unexpected turn. Jeffrey sneaks into the singer’s apartment and unexpectedly finds himself the witness to a violent S&M excursion, as a wild and out-of-control Dennis Hopper (as Frank Booth) bursts into the room and has his way with Vallens. What transpires from this moment on is just crazy, as Jeffrey gets caught up in a strange sexual relationship with Vallens, all while trying to stay hidden from the dangerous Booth.

It really is strange how the movie flips a relatively standard mystery plot into a violent S&M freakshow, but would you really expect anything less from David Lynch? The movie zips along as it pleases, throwing all sorts of odd behavior at the viewer, and it even includes a seemingly random (but incredible) lip-syncing scene featuring Dean Stockwell:

No matter how weird the movie gets, it is always entertaining. This is helped by the addition of Dennis Hopper, in an absolutely deliriously over-the-top performance as the psychopathic Frank Booth. The man is a gas-huffing lunatic who has a strong affinity for Pabst Blue Ribbon:

Seriously, that line had me in hysterics. Isabella Rossellini is also fantastic as her character gradually evolves over the film’s running time, leaving her bare and broken along the way. Her performance drew much sympathy from Roger Ebert, who surprisingly gave this film a negative review.

The bottom line here is that Blue Velvet is quintessential Lynch. I found the movie to be fascinating, but I am still trying to wrap my head around some of its ideas (and reading other theories just muddied my thoughts even further). As expected, this seems to be a film that will reward further on subsequent viewings, and writing this post has made me eager to see Blue Velvet again. If there’s one thing that can be said, it’s that Lynch has a way of sticking around in your brain.

8/10

Movie Project #2: Blow Out [1981]

Due to the overwhelming success of my initial Movies Project, I decided to do a second round for 2012. This time around I put a greater emphasis on directors I am not familiar with, but I also tried to compile a mix of different genres and eras. This will be an ongoing project with the finish date being sometime this year.

Blow Out [1981]

Blow Out [1981]
Director: Brian De Palma
Genre: Crime/Drama/Mystery
Starring: John Travolta, Nancy Allen and John Lithgow
Runtime: 107 minutes

I don’t watch the news. It’s too depressing.

Frequently cited as one of Quentin Tarantino’s top three favorite films, Blow Out is a gripping thriller that has built up a bit of a cult following since its 1981 release. Last year, the movie was treated to an expansive Criterion Collection package, which was a big reason why I became so interested in seeing this.

John Travolta stars as B-movie sound technician Jack Terry, a man who has worked on such classic titles as Blood Beach, Blood Beach Two, and Bordello of Blood. One night, while he is out recording frogs, owls and other night sounds, Jack witnesses a horrific car crash. One of the car’s tires blows out, sending the vehicle and its inhabitants plunging over a bridge and into the river below. Jack frantically dives in to help, and pulls out the girl trapped inside, Sally (Allen). The other victim, later found out to be a governor and presidential hopeful, is not so lucky, and he dies on scene.

Initial signs point to this being a “freak” car accident, but Jack, being a sound guy and all, is positive that he heard a gunshot before the blow out. Revisiting the audio from the evening seems to confirm this, and now he wants to dig deeper and try to figure out just who the hell shot out the tire.

Blow Out [1981]

Now here’s where shit gets real: there was another person at the river that evening, Manny Karp (Dennis Franz). He recorded the entire incident on film, and he begins shopping his photos around to all sorts of tabloids. With some particularly helpful prior knowledge, he was at the scene to make a quick buck. He didn’t shoot the gun, however.

That was Burke (Lithgow), an assassin who was hired as part of a greater political conspiracy. The plan (allegedly) was never to have him murder anyone, but Burke decided to take things to another level on his own. Now he is hot on the tail of Jack and Sally, with plans to kill both of them and finally cover up this political scandal once and for all.

If Blow Out sounds like a film with deep layers embedded with conspiracies, well, it is. There are obvious allusions to real life events such as Watergate, the JFK assassination and the Chappaquiddick incident. There are so many ideas in place, and all of them are covered remarkably. Just as Jack Terry methodically edits sound for B-movies, director Brian De Palma carefully crafts a film that connects on many different levels.

Blow Out [1981]

Part of the film’s brilliance also lies heavily on John Travolta’s shoulders. This may very well be his finest performance, as he is extra charismatic as a regular guy who just so happened to be in the right place at the wrong time. Much can be said about John Lithgow’s icy cold take as the assassin/serial killer, a role he would expound upon even more nearly 30 years later in TV’s Dexter. Nancy Allen is passable at best, but she does not detract from the film’s quality.

There were moments during the second act where I felt the film was kicking its tires a bit (pun intended?), but the epic conclusion really renewed my sense of appreciation. The ending, draped in patriotic symbolism, is one that I will never forget.

With its grandeur release from Criterion, Blow Out has much deservedly reached a new generation of fans (myself included). Fans of crime, mystery and thrillers ought to give this a watch.

8/10

Movie Project #16: Psycho [1960]

The 50 Movies Project is a personal “marathon” of mine. In June, I compiled a list of 50 movies that I felt I needed to see by the end of the year. Old, new, foreign, English — it doesn’t matter. These are all movies that I have heard a lot about and have been wanting to see for some time. This project gives me a way to stay focused on the goal.

Psycho [1960]

Psycho [1960]
Directors: Alfred Hitchcock
Genre: Horror/Mystery/Thriller
Language: English
Country: USA

When I was in high school, I tried to catch up on some movies that I had missed out on (a slightly less focused version of what I am doing now). On one trip to the video store (remember those?), I walked out with Psycho, excited to see one of my first Hitchcock films. Unfortunately, I grabbed Gus Van Sant’s 1998 critically-maligned remake by mistake. I watched it anyway, and sure enough it was terrible. I am glad now, many years later, that I have FINALLY seen the original classic. And yes, it is eons better than Van Sant’s ill-advised remake.

Psycho is home to many iconic cinematic moments. The brilliantly manipulated opening credit sequence, Bernard Herrmann’s frantic score, and Anthony Perkins’ legendary performance as Norman Bates. Oh, and of course, the much-referenced (and parodied) shower scene.

Psycho [1960] - shower scene

The movie is almost a tale of two stories. The first part focuses on Marion Crane (Janet Leigh), a secretary who spontaneously decides to steal $40,000 from one of her employer’s clients while on the way to the bank. She quickly hits the road and becomes paranoid of everything and everyone, especially a police officer who stops her and makes note of her awkward behavior. After crossing into California, heavy rain becomes a major issue, and Marion pulls over to the nearest lodge: the Bates Motel.

This is where she meets the socially awkward Norman Bates (Perkins), who happily provides her with one of the twelve vacant rooms. Something doesn’t seem right with him, but he appears harmless to Marion. Unfortunately for her, this is where she meets her demise in the unforgettable shower scene.

The second part of the movie follows the investigation of Marion’s disappearance. A private detective (Martin Balsam) is hired by her employer to find out what she was up to, and he eventually heads out to the motel after consulting with Marion’s sister Lila (Vera Miles) and her lover Sam Loomis (John Gavin). It doesn’t take much for them to figure out that Marion was at the Bates Motel, and suspicions arise about Norman and his mother, who lives in the house nearby. It’s clear that something shady happened.

The iconic Bates Motel

Of course, Psycho’s plot is something most are familiar with. Even though I knew what was going to happen, I still could often feel my heart racing throughout the film. This is a tense, suspenseful ride that is thrilling even today.

So yeah, Anthony Perkins is absolutely incredible as Norman. This is a career-defining performance if I’ve ever seen one. His stuttering, his twitching, his all-around awkwardness just feels natural. He seems like a decent guy at first, just socially inept with obvious mental issues. While the supporting cast generally deliver strong performances as well, this is very much Perkins’ show.

A thriller in every sense of the word, Psycho is more than worthy of its legendary status. This is easily one of the most influential movies of all time, and the character of Norman Bates is one of the most memorable of any type of film. I wish I had never seen the remake, especially before this, but it was still interesting to compare the two. While I wouldn’t go so far as to say it is my favorite Hitchcock (I have Rope and Rear Window pegged slightly ahead), it still ranks up there with the best.

9/10

Movie Project #14: L.A. Confidential [1997]

The 50 Movies Project is a personal “marathon” of mine. In June, I compiled a list of 50 movies that I felt I needed to see by the end of the year. Old, new, foreign, English — it doesn’t matter. These are all movies that I have heard a lot about and have been wanting to see for some time. This project gives me a way to stay focused on the goal.

L.A. Confidential [1997]

L.A. Confidential [1997]
Directors: Curtis Hanson
Genre: Crime/Drama/Mystery
Language: English
Country: USA

When I played through the fantastic LA Noire video game this summer, I could not help but get swept into the dark and seedy world of 1940’s Los Angeles. Many, many articles and reviews on the game mentioned its influences: old school Film Noir, Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett novels, and perhaps the biggest, L.A. Confidential. I was ecstatic to finally see this 1997 modern noir title.

Set in 1950s Los Angeles, L.A. Confidential revolves around three officers in the LAPD. There’s Bud White (Russell Crowe), a quick-tempered cop who does anything to punish woman-beaters. There’s Ed Exley (Guy Pearce), a rookie officer who wants to do everything by the book and refuses to break the law to provide justice. Naturally, this makes him an outcast in the department. There’s Sgt. Jack Vincennes (Kevin Spacey), a narcotics detective who is in cahoots with Hush-Hush tabloid magazine editor Sid Hudgeons (Danny DeVito). His side “job” is arresting celebrities and letting Sid take photos of them caught in the act.

L.A. Confidential [1997]

These three men become intertwined in a web of corruption, deceit and lies within the police department, all of which happens after a coffee shop massacre leaves six people dead, including a crooked police officer. So many subplots, characters and areas are brought up throughout the film’s 138 minute runtime, but this is expertly manipulated by director Curtis Hanson in a way that brings everything together. It really is fascinating how the movie brings in so many different details, yet is able to have everything make sense in the end.

There are two other major players in the movie who must be mentioned. Dudley Smith (the always excellent James Cromwell) is the leader of the police department. He has a tendency to call his men “good lads” and encourages them to twist the law in order to deliver justice. Lynn Bracken (Kim Basinger) is the female of choice, a Veronica Lake look-alike hooker who is dragged into the mess due to the coffee shop death of a fellow Hollywood starlet-imposter prostitute.

L.A. Confidential [1997]

There is so much to like about L.A. Confidential. The acting is phenomenal, with what is truly an amazing cast. So many big names, all of whom are deserving of their recognition from this film. Guy Pearce in particular stood out to me, as he effortlessly succeeds in playing a sniveling little snitch who crawls under your skin. Yet by the end of the movie, his performance led me to gain a new-found respect for his character. Maybe there is some merit in playing by the rules?

Not once did L.A. Confidential feel tedious. The movie runs at a brisk pace with a lot of thrilling moments. The dialogue is sharp, the story elegant, and the characters are terrific. This is everything I could have hoped for in a modern noir, and as it stands right now, this is my favorite movie I have seen so far in this project. Simply amazing.

10/10

Movie Review: Source Code [2011, Jones]

Source Code [2011]

Source Code [2011]
Director: Duncan Jones
Genre: Mystery/Sci-Fi/Thriller
Language: English
Country: USA

Groundhog Day meets… Speed?

Colter Stevens (Jake Gyllenhall) is having a hell of a day. He wakes up on board a Chicago-bound Metra commuter train, and he is no idea how he got there. Worse yet, he appears to be living in someone else’s body. This person, a school teacher named Sean, is sitting across from his good friend Christina (Michelle Monaghan). Everything appears to be business as usual until the train explodes after exactly eight minutes, killing everyone on board. Stevens wakes up in an unfamiliar location and is quickly contacted by Air Force Captain Colleen Goodwin (Vera Farmiga), who briefs him on his situation. Stevens learns that there was a bomb on the train, and that he is being used as part of a secret U.S. Military program to figure out who placed the explosives. He is forced to repeat the same eight minute sequence over and over until he determines who was responsible for the destruction.

Source Code [2011]

Source Code is pretty intense, with several twists and turns amidst the frantic sci-fi thriller pacing. Even though it presents some interesting philosophical and ethical questions, the movie has a mostly benevolent attitude throughout (somewhat similar to The Adjustment Bureau in this regard). There are several moments where one will need to suspend their disbelief, but this is to be expected given the plot premise.

It’s easy to get behind the character of Colter Stevens thanks to a great performance from Gyllenhall. He brings a certain human element to his character, even bringing the laughs during dire moments. Michelle Monaghan does well despite having what is essentially a throwaway role. I was most impressed with Vera Farmiga, who excels despite being on a computer screen during many of her scenes. She is quickly becoming one of my favorite actresses. Jeffrey Wright is also another standout here as the leader of the Source Code program, effortlessly showing he is the man in charge.

Source Code [2011]

I enjoyed Source Code about as much as I enjoyed The Adjustment Bureau, which is to say quite a bit. Duncan Jones’ title digs deeper and is perhaps “smarter” overall but both are a lot of fun. I would have opted for a different ending in Source Code, but it hardly ruined the experience for me. Fast-paced, intelligent and suspenseful, Source Code is one of the better movies to come out this year.

8/10

Movie Review: Irréversible [2002]

Irréversible [2002]

Irréversible [2002]
Directors: Gaspar Noé
Genre: Crime/Drama/Mystery
Language: French
Country: France

I have heard over and over again that Irréversible is one of the most disturbing movies ever created, and finally I had to see what all the fuss was about. Let’s just say that by the time the credits rolled, I was absolutely speechless.

First things first, believe everything you have heard. This is a brutal and often downright disgusting film, and it is painfully hard to watch. The movie is about a woman named Alex (Monica Bellucci) who is out partying with her boyfriend Marcus (real-life husband Vincent Cassel) and her ex, Pierre (Albert Dupontel). After leaving the party, she is brutally raped by a stranger (Jo Prestia) while walking home alone. When Marcus and Pierre find out what happened, they set out to get revenge on the asshole by taking justice into their own hands.

Irréversible [2002]

Irreversible is told in reverse chronological order (a la Memento) so the brutality begins right away. In the early moments, we are taken to a gay nightclub called Rectum (how subtle) where the two guys believe the rapist is hanging out. While they frantically look for the assailant, the camera is twisting and turning all over the place, making it difficult to see what is happening. Although the frequent camera shifts are initially difficult to stomach, they actually work out quite well. We don’t really NEED to see everything that is going on in order to understand the frenetic actions on screen. The topsy-turvy camera is a major part of the movie, although it thankfully gets toned down a bit as the film progresses.

During this critical early scene, the music is undeniably fierce. Thomas Bangalter’s (one half of Daft Punk) score is tense, and often terrifying in its own right. His music truly adds to the frantic pace during the early-goings. He definitely encapsulated the raw experience on screen, although it is not what I would expect from one half of the electronic duo who created “One More Time.”

By the time the infamous rape scene happens – about halfway through the movie – it is beyond difficult to watch. All of that shaky camerawork I mentioned earlier is gone during this scene. Instead, the camera sits stationary while we are forced to watch Alex get raped for nine straight minutes. It is absolutely disgusting, and to call it “fucked up” is an understatement.

Irréversible [2002]

Still, even with the obscene violence and sheer brutality, Irréversible remains a fascinating film. The brilliant reverse storytelling makes you think about the events from a different perspective. The soundtrack is menacing and perfect for the actions on screen. And the camera work initially seems out of control, but somehow it just works. Kudos to Monica Bellucci, Vincent Cassel and Albert Dupontel for having the cojones to go through with something like this.

This is not a movie for everyone, and there is no doubt that this is a cruel and punishing 90 minutes. There are no boundaries here, which makes for an unpleasant, yet stimulating experience.

Simply put, Irreversible is a stunning film that just does not hold back.

9/10

Buried [2010]

Buried [2010]

Buried [2010]
Directors: Rodrigo Cortés
Genre: Drama/Mystery/Thriller
Language: English
Country: Spain/USA/France

Ryan Reynolds. Buried Alive. In A Box. For 90 Minutes.

In a nutshell, that is Buried. Quite a concept, eh? In the wrong hands, this could be an absolute disaster. I mean, how can you make a 90-minute movie about someone in a box without it becoming trite and boring? Thankfully, director Rodrigo Cortés was more than up to the task for this challenge. Buried is easily one of the most suspenseful movies I have seen in quite some time, and it never has a dull moment.

Ryan Reynolds stars as Paul Conroy, an American truck driver in Iraq who was ambushed by insurgents while working. He blacked out during the attack and woke up buried alive. We don’t see any of the attack in the movie — this starts with Conroy in the box, desperately trying to find a way out. He is buried with a Zippo lighter and a cellphone, and he frantically uses the latter to call anyone and everyone who might help out (often with less than desirable results). We hear the conversations with everyone he talks to — 911, the Pentagon, his employer, etc. — but we never see things from their end. All we see is Conroy and the flickers of light from his Zippo, or the illuminated screen of the cellphone.

This is very much a one man show, and Reynolds does an admirable job keeping viewers entertained despite the lack of options on screen. His portrayal of Conroy is what I imagine most people would act like — he reacts in ways that I would likely do as well, alternating between rational thinking to just generally freaking the fuck out. Combine his performance with Cortes’s claustrophobic camerawork and you have one hell of a stressful movie.

Buried could have easily been a trainwreck of epic proportions, but it exceeded any and all expectations I had going into it. This is a non-stop thriller from beginning to end, and there were a lot of moments where I had no idea what was going to happen. As a vehicle for suspense, this is very impressive. Quite frankly, Buried is one of the best movies to come out in 2010. Highly recommended, unless you have severe claustrophobia.

9/10